Aug
13
2009

The secondary title of “The Living Matrix” is “A Film on the New Science of Healing”. The intent of the filmmakers was to establish a connection between established scientific theories, our health, and healing. How well did they do? As I noted in my review, the filmmakers have failed to provide links to existing science. Neither the DVD nor the website currently provide any links to published scientific papers. In the absence of anything to back it up, the film’s claim that there’s a new “viable scientific theory” is not credible.

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One particular claim from the movie came from Dietmar Cimbal, DVM, who the filmmakers label as a “biophysics researcher”. Dr. Cimbal talks about direction shifts of flocks of birds:

“Every one of us has watched a flock of birds in flight and how it changes direction. Instantly, all birds in the flock change direction. So, it seems as if a superior bird-brain controls all the birds simultaneously. That only works with the help of those fields, since the fields are able to transfer, with no information loss, and, above all, instantaneously with no time delay.”

A skeptic would have several questions at this point: Why does Dr. Cimbal presume the shifts are instantaneous? What observations did he make of flocks, and what instruments did he use to measure them? Where did he publish his results? If he was using someone else’s research, where is that research?

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Aug
03
2009

VIS – co – e – LAS – tic

Viscoelastic” is a term used by physicists to describe materials that behave in two different ways: a fluid (viscous) and a solid (elastic). Viscous materials are fluids like water, motor oil, or honey. Viscous substances have a great capacity to absorb energy. Amusement parks use water to safely slow down rides after a drop. This video shows a 131-foot drop on “Pilgrim’s Plunge” a new water ride at Holiday World in Santa Claus, Indiana. Will Koch is the president of Holiday World; he gets to ride with The Big Guy.

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Jul
01
2009

If you wanted to explore Mars, what kind of bridge would you take with you? How would you build the bridges? How would you make sure the bridge will work for a variety of terrain? Since you must carry the bridge all the way to Mars, it must be small, light, and highly reliable. Researchers from the Technical University of Munich have a wonderful answer: a tensegrity truss.

BRIDGING MARS from Zoran Novacki on Vimeo.

Tensegrity masts are also used for deploying a variety of instrumentation and solar panels on orbiting satellites. The tensile network is bearing the weight of the structure; by increasing the tension, the mast deploys. It’s a remarkably material-efficient way to “reach out” with structure. Tensegrity masts can even teach us how to reach out more effectively with our arms and legs.

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